CLOSE-UP. Exhibition audio guide

Exhibition Schaumainkai, 60596 Frankfurt am Main, DE

Audioguide for the exhibition CLOSE-UP: The Film Costumes of Barbara Baum. The audio descriptions of the 52 costumes and the contents of the display cases and tactile stations were produced by audioskript on behalf of The Deutsches Filmmuseum.

Author: Isabelle Bastian

HAUTNAH. Die Filmkostüme von Barbara Baum – Sonderausstellung zum Schaffen der Kostümbildnerin

HAUTNAH. Die Filmkostüme von Barbara Baum – Sonderausstellung zum Schaffen der Kostümbildnerin

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21 Stations

Welcome / Exhibition layout (in the foyer)

A warm welcome to the Deutsches Filmmuseum and to “Close-Up: The Film Costumes of Barbara Baum,” an exhibition dedicated to the remarkable creativity of the renowned costume designer. You will now hear some general information about the exhibition. The text is located on the wall in front of you.

Costume Design is the Third Director

Costume design is one of the essential cinematic arts. It assists the audience in identifying cinematic spaces and eras. It makes the characters’ traits visible, indicates their social status and their state of mind. In doing so it produces identificatory proximity. Put simply, it helps us identify with the characters. Costumes enable the performers to immerse themselves in the characters that portray. The costume fabric materializes the moral values and desires of the characters: sometimes protective and reinforcing; sometimes fantastic and exaggerated; sometimes concealing, disguising, or even exposing. The fabrics – often historical in origin – not only constitute a visual accent within the composition but also ensure authenticity.

Costume designer Barbara Baum has an extraordinary sense for fabrics. They are not only her working material, but also a source of inspiration: “I always think in terms of fabrics. I even get goose bumps over exceptional fabrics! For me, the decision to use this or that very specific fabric is usually already half the costume,” she says about herself.

You are currently in the foyer of this special exhibition. The elevators are on your right. On your left, is the staircase. The restrooms are one story higher, on the fifth floor.
The tactile map in front of you shows how the exhibition space is divided up: the foyer, the main hall, and the various stages and display cases where the exhibits are presented.
Behind you, slightly to the left, is a rectangular display table showing the early designs of Barbara Baum. Behind that, parallel to the table, is a partition wall separating off the costume library. On that partition wall you will find Baum’s filmography and four of the awards she has received: two Bavarian Film Awards, one RTL Golden Lion, and an “Honorary Lola” for outstanding contribution to German cinema. On the back of the partition, in the reading area, are quotes about costume designers and costume design in general.

In front of you to the right, and also slightly further on to the left, are entrances to the main hall. On the wall next to the entrances are buttons that open the doors automatically. The back wall of the main hall displays photographs of costume fittings and film sets in two box frames. Seats are positioned in front of the photographs. The hall, with its dark walls and wooden floor, is diagonally in front of you. Its surface area is 375 meters squared.

Along the walls, numbered in a clockwise direction, are nine stages presenting a total of 52 costumes from 18 different movies. The exhibition begins to the left of the left-hand entrance with Stage 1, dedicated to the movie Buddenbrooks. The following eight stages exhibit costumes from the movies Fathers and Sons, Burning Secret, Becoming Colette, Romy, The Devil and Ms. D, A Girl Called Rosemary, The House of the Spirits, Voyager, Aimee & Jaguar, Catherine the Great, and seven films by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, with whom Baum enjoyed an intense working relationship. Digital canvases behind the costumes present a montage of movie clips.

The narrow gaps between the stages are marked by thin raised strips on the floor designed to help you find your way with a cane. On the floor in front of the stages – in most cases on the left – long black wooden strips running parallel to the stage indicate the location of wooden pillars. On the top of those pillars are QR codes. If you scan the QR code with your smartphone you will hear descriptions of the costumes in front of you. In front of Stage 9, the same kind of floor markings indicate three tactile stations featuring relief graphics of Baum’s sketches of the various costumes The QR code for the tactile graphic is located at the bottom center of the board, within a tactile square frame.

The original film costumes – the results of artistic ingenuity, the art of tailoring, and not least careful calculation and planning – have been installed in the studio space. Outside the framework of the cinematic space, these testimonies to the art of staging fabric have a presence all their own. Their static presentation enables visitors to closely examine the costumes, which in the museum setting become three-dimensional exhibits. Labels indicate the material they are made of: crêpe, brocade, paduasoy, gold and silver lamé, muslin, organdy, velvet, satin, silk, lace, taffeta, tulle, tweed, wool – all of them fabrics that bear witness to Barbara Baum’s constant pursuit of the highest quality and the “right” material. Because the original costumes may not be touched for reasons of conservation, an area has been set up where visitors can feel 50 samples of the high-quality fabrics.

This area is in the middle of the hall. It has gray studded flooring and is designed to resemble Barbara Baum’s studio. The area is partly separated from the rest of the space by frames covered with fabric or with graphics. You may touch these fabrics. Please note that there are columns and pillars in the corners of the studio area. There are several possibilities to enter this area.

This is where Barbara Baum talks about her profession. Materials from her archive, such as costume plots, costume lists, and much more testify to her first intense examination of screenplays. Concrete ideas grow out of this that are materialized and ultimately integrated into the image on film. Budget plans, invoices, daily call sheets, and purchasing lists bear witness to the requirements of the profession. Minutes of meetings, correspondence, fitting and continuity photographs testify to how costume design is embedded in the other cinematic crafts.

In the middle of the studio area is a large table with an end grain tabletop. It has four display cases, and monitors set into the tabletop. These monitors are represented as raised rectangles on the map. On the narrow, left edge are files with fabric samples for you to touch. A shelf displays archive boxes, fabric samples, and various types of lace. To the left of that you can touch some other fabric samples, which have both text and braille labels.

We hope you have an enjoyable, multi-sensory experience at the “Close-Up” exhibition. The audio descriptions of the 52 costumes and the contents of the display cases and tactile stations were produced by audioskript on behalf of The Deutsches Film Museum.

Foyer display case

The display case in the foyer exhibits some of costume designer Barbara Baum’s early work. Baum’s artistic talent was evident at a young age, and her father – who was a painter and architect – encouraged her natural aptitude for drawing. Her aunt worked as a weaver and fabric designer, and it was she who awakened a passion for fabrics and clothing in Baum. After graduating high school, Baum decided to start a tailoring apprenticeship to learn the craft from scratch. She passed her apprenticeship exam with top marks and was accepted into the Textile and Fashion School of Berlin (HTW). She went on to attend a Meisterschule or “master school” for the trade.

During her studies, Barbara Baum kept afloat with money from her first commissions. At this time, she was living in an apartment sublet by an acting agency, through which she met a number of actors and directors. Meanwhile she was sewing costumes for the Berlin theater houses Vaganten Bühne and Theater am Kurfürstendamm. She designed the costumes for the female roles in the production of Ionesco’s Rhinoceros.

One day, an actress suggested she apply to the public television service for West Berlin, Sender Freies Berlin – where Günther Naumann, set designer and outfitter of some of Peter Lilienthal’s films, was on the commission. Baum first landed a role as assistant to Werner Juhrke, sewing costumes for the TV movie "Premeditated Crime" (FRG 1967, directed by Peter Lilienthal). For Lilienthal’s next movie, Jakob von Gunten (FRG 1971), she was hired as a costume designer. Barbara Baum’s career had begun!

In the left-hand section of the display case is a black sheet of A1 paper. Written across it in white capital letters is the note: “pattern for the midsummer dress.” Below this, Baum has calculated the fabric required for a dress width of 1.4 meters: “1.85 m of yellow linen, 35 cm of lining for a cape, 25 cm each of colored trim.” Displayed to the right of these notes is the design for the midsummer dress: a close-fitting, calf-length strap dress that is buttoned at the front. The shoulders are covered by a cape that hangs over the forearms. The bottom section of the black paper shows the cutting pattern for the dress and lining.
To the right of this are two sketches in portrait format. These ink drawings are on white paper and mounted on black cardboard. The top sketch shows a narrow-waisted day dress with a wide fabric belt; the bottom, a casual kimono-style ensemble consisting of a high-necked top with long, wide sleeves worn over tight pants. The waist is emphasized with a wide fabric belt.

To the right of this are three color sketches depicting:
- A white raincoat with black dots and a wide black belt
- A wide-cut red velvet evening jacket with three-quarter sleeves
- A rain ensemble consisting of a tight skirt and hip-length high-necked rain cape

In the right-hand section of the display case are designs for two earlier commissions. One shows a blue tweed suit with fabric samples of various blue tones and a brushstroke in blue watercolor on a piece of paper. Under the fabric samples is the note: “For this tweed suit (a French fabric) I had the georgette for the blouse undergo extra dyeing according to my color specification! The client has wonderful red blond hair!” The word “red” is underlined twice. Next to the sketch is a contact print of six mini black-and-white photos, showing the tight skirt of the suit on a mannequin. The wide waistband extends up to just beneath the chest, two straps run over the shoulders and cross at the back.
Underneath is the design for a long-sleeved dress. A line of buttons leads down from the left shoulder to below the waist. There is a walking slit in the front of the skirt. The fabric sample features a floral pattern in blue, green and pink. Barbara Baum has added the note: “This dress is light as a feather and pure silk; a very wide-cut dress that is held together only by the belt. It looks a bit heavy in the photo.” To the left of the sketch is a black-and-white contact print of six mini photos showing the dress on a mannequin.

Also exhibited are four designs for Baum’s early works for the theater. Baum designed all costumes for the female cast in the production of Ionescu’s Rhinoceros, which was staged by Wolfgang Spier at the Theater am Kurfürstendamm. On display are three sketches for the role of “Daisy” and one for “The Housewife.” On the top left is a short-sleeved, knee-length summer dress worn by Daisy in Act I. It has buttons that run from the left shoulder to the hem. Attached to the sketch is a pink fabric swatch. To the right of this is Daisy’s costume for Act II in the office: a light blouse with a dark spotted bow at the neck and a knee-length skirt with a belt and a walking slit at the front. Also attached to this sketch are two fabric swatches: one black and one dark with white dots. For Daisy’s appearance in Act IV, Baum has designed a dark checkered suit-dress with a dark sweater. The fabric has a salt-and-pepper trim.
The sketch for The Housewife in Act I is of a dress buttoned at the front to below the waist with a narrow belt and a wide pleated skirt. A collar with wider pleats lies over the shoulders. The tight sleeves extend to the wrists and are decorated at the ends with wide flounces. The costume is completed with a turban-like hat that features a bow above the forehead.

Stage 1: Buddenbrooks

Stage 1: On display are a total of eight costumes from the movie Buddenbrooks (Germany/Austria 2007/08), directed by Heinrich Breloer.

The left-hand side of the stage in front of you is built in a niche.
The costumes will be described from left to right.

The first costume on the left is: a light-pink gown as worn by Jessica Schwarz in her role as Tony Buddenbrook.

The gown has a close-fitting traditional bodice and a voluminous skirt that cascades lightly to the ground. Both parts are made from translucent white gauze underlaid with a light-pink fabric. The gauze has a delicate floral pattern in dark pink and light green. The bodice has a wide, round neckline edged with a slender pink braid. A vertical row of four fabric-covered buttons adorns the center of the bodice. The sleeves are short and puffy and adorned with a net border.

To the right of that is: a beige evening gown with black Chantilly lace as worn by Iris Berben in her role as consul’s wife Elisabeth “Bethsy” Buddenbrook.

This floor-length off-the-shoulder gown of light-beige silk taffeta has a close-fitting bodice with a wide décolleté. A swathe of hand-made black Chantilly lace falls loosely over the chest, back and upper arms. Many small pleats give the wide, sweeping skirt plenty of volume.

The third costume along is:
a formal suit with embroidered vest
as worn by Armin Mueller-Stahl in his role as Consul Johann “Jean” Buddenbrook.

This suit consists of a black, worsted wool tailcoat and black pants. The collar of the tailcoat is covered with black silk. Vertical stripes of silk – so-called “galloons” – run down the outside leg of the pants. The white shirt has a high, soft wing collar – that is, a stand-up collar with turned-down points. Around the collar is a knotted “ascot tie” – a wide formal tie – of embroidered cream-colored silk.
The vest is also cream-colored. The broad vest lapels and the area to both sides of the button placket are adorned with intricate embroidery.

The costume on the left, at the front of the stage, in the center is:
a moiré silk skirt and blouse with a lace upturned collar
as worn by Iris Berben in her role as consul’s wife Elisabeth “Bethsy” Buddenbrook.

This floor-length skirt with wide pleats is made from violet silk, with diagonal, stitched pleats called tucks. The subtly pink blouse is waist-length and has a delicate light-gray pattern and fabric-covered buttons. The round collar is made of four layers of soft lace and sheer embroidered organdy. The cuffs on the wide sleeves feature decorative folds, fixed at the sides with embroidery stitches. The fabric on the shoulders and at the waist is gathered – “smocked” – with a trellis stitch, creating diamond shapes. In the center of the back is a large bow.

The final costume on the left-hand side of the stage is: a blue gown, also known as the “peacock dress,” as worn by Léa Bosco in her role as Gerda Buddenbrook.

This long-sleeved, floor-length gown is made from an extremely lustrous satin fabric known as “duchesse.” Its color – a rich medium-blue – is called “peacock blue.” The gown has a high stand-up collar of black and gold lace, and the deep, square neckline is filled with a panel of the same lace.
The full skirt with train is held in shape by a hooped petticoat. The hem of the skirt features a wavy border made of two pleated strips of fabric, one over the other, decorated with braid interwoven with gold. The same decorated strips of fabric can be found below the elbows on the sleeves. A dark belt with a peacock-feather motif accentuates the waist.

To the right of that is: a christening suit as worn by Mark Waschke in his role as Thomas Buddenbrook.

This three-piece suit consists of a frock coat, pants and vest. The knee-length frock coat has gray silk on the cuffs, collar and lapels. The pants are a lighter, blueish-gray color. The gray vest with purple jacquard embroidery also has purple piping, which is a narrow tubular trim. The white shirt has a high, soft collar. Around it is a wine-red ascot with light-colored dots. A decorative tie pin adorns the knot.

The next costume is: a mauve/indigo gown as worn by Léa Bosco in her role as Gerda Buddenbrook.

This floor-length gown has a voluminous skirt with a train. The shimmering taffeta changes color from mauve to indigo depending on how the light falls. The narrow waist is accentuated by a blue velvet belt, narrow at the back but forming a wide diamond shape at the front. The bodice of embroidered taffeta has an upturned collar and wide trumpet sleeves with fringed cuffs. The embroidery pattern features forms that recall ferns, stars and vines. From underneath the fringed cuffs emerge undersleeves of shimmering gray organza encircled with blue silk ribbons.

On the far right is: a ball gown as worn by Léa Bosco in her role as Gerda Buddenbrook.

This floor-length gown was made from gleaming light-red silk damask featuring a pattern of the same hue. Around the waist is a ribbon of the same material and color, edged with a darker velvet. At the front it passes through a buckle, at the back it is tied into a large bow with ends that trail down, drawing the eye to the train at the back of the full skirt. The hem is edged with red velvet. Underneath this is a gathered border. Ruffled facing with beaded fringe and gold lace surrounds the wide, round décolleté, continuing round to the back. The short, puffed sleeves feature bundles of small bows made from ribbon and are edged with more gold beaded fringe.

Stage 2: Fathers and Sons

Stage 2: On display are four costumes from the TV miniseries Fathers and Sons (Germany 1984-86), directed by Bernhard Sinkel. The costumes will be described from left to right.

The first costume is: Silk dressing gown as worn by Burt Lancaster in his role as Geheimrat Carl Julius Deutz.

On one occasion, Deutz wears the calf-length dressing gown with white, buttoned pajamas and slippers; on another occasion he wears it over a white shirt with a button-down collar and dark trousers with suspenders. The dressing gown is made of black silk and features a jacquard pattern of leaves, flowers and vines. The flowers are blue and purple in color while the vine and leaf motifs are mainly rendered in gold. The quilted silk cuffs and shawl collar are plain black with a black braid trim and are roughly the width of a hand. On the right and left hip of the dressing gown are two pockets with a black flap. The garment is lined with cream-colored silk.
In the film, the bathrobe is secured at the waist with a tie belt made of the same fabric. Here, the garment is exhibited with a blue cord the width of a finger, which ends in knots with tassels.

To the right of the first costume is: a patterned crêpe de chine dress with gold lamé spots as worn by Julie Christie in her role as Charlotte Deutz.

This crêpe de chine dress is knee-length with a floral pattern and a fine pebbled texture. The bodice is slightly smocked at the waist; the long sleeves taper towards to wrists and are close-fitting on the forearm. The V-shaped neckline has a narrow cream-colored lapel. At the base of the V, the lapel is adorned on the left and the right with wing-like cutouts that grow wider to the sides. The lower section of the wide neckline is filled with a panel of cream-colored fabric featuring thin horizontal pleats. Underneath the dress, she wears a slip with lace trim. The floral print that covers the rest of the dress resembles a dense carpet of daisies. The flowers vary in size and have brown-gold centers, white and blue petals and inconsistent black contours. In some places, golden leaves glimmer among the flowers. The dress comes with a soft tie-belt made of the same fabric. In the film, Charlotte Deutz wears the dress with white stockings and gold, ankle-strap shoes with a low heel.

The third dress is: an ice-blue crêpe de chine dress with lace inserts as worn by Julie Christie in her role as Charlotte Deutz.

This ankle-length, ice-blue dress has a large V-neckline and kimono sleeves. The dress incorporates a close-fitting cream lace blouse with long sleeves and a high-neck lace collar with a frilled trim. The opaque fabric has horizontal stripes interwoven with gold. In the film, Charlotte Deutz wears a round golden brooch at the base of the collar.

The bodice of the dress features four strips of ice-blue silk taffeta that run parallel to the neckline, with cream-colored lace inserted in between. A wide waistband of cream lace accentuates the figure and a long row of convex buttons fastens the dress at the back. The skirt of the dress falls in soft folds. The base of the hobble skirt is gathered just above the hem with a narrow taffeta trim, so the wearer can only take small steps. In the film, the actress wears the dress with white stockings and white closed-toe shoes with a low heel and decorative silver clasps.

The costume on the far right is: a dress with black tulle lace as worn by Julie Christie in her role as Charlotte Deutz.

On another occasion, the actress wears a two-piece evening gown overlaid with black beaded embroidery. The straight, cream-colored silk skirt is covered with black tulle. Sewn into this tulle are vertical strips of sequin-studded black silk, between which are embroidered leaf appliqués, black pearls and additional sequins. The bodice of the dress is made of cream-colored lace and also features leaf motifs. Wide-cut half sleeves are layered over long, close-fitting sleeves. The shoulders and upper body are covered by a black tulle lace mantle featuring the same leaf appliqué and beads. The bottom edge of the mantle is wavy and has a braid trim.

Stage 3: Burning Secret & Becoming Colette

Stage 3: On display are three costumes from the movie Burning Secret (GB/FRG 1988), directed by Andrew Birkin, and two costumes from the movie Becoming Colette (Germany/GB/France 1990/91), directed by Danny Huston.

The movie costumes from BURNING SECRET will be described first.

The first costume on the left is: a red dinner gown as worn by Faye Dunaway in her role as Sonya Tuchmann.

This ankle-length, loosely cut dinner gown with train is made of ruby red chiffon. A chenille-brocade belt – the width of a hand and without a buckle – emphasizes the waist. The belt is gold with large embroidered black flowers and black trimming. There is a deep V-neckline on both the front and back of the bodice that reaches down to the waist. The border of the neckline is adorned with transparent, reddish beads that create a flowering vine motif. The lower portion of the V-neckline on the front and the back is filled with a panel of silver lace. Three narrow bands decorated with red beads run across the back at shoulder-blade height. The top band is taut while the two lower ones hang loosely in the neckline. The wide sleeves are tapered from the shoulder to the wrist. The fabric is gathered at the forearms, where there is row of small flat buttons covered in red chiffon. The hem of the sleeve is adorned with transparent beads.

A gathered overskirt, open at the front, falls loosely over the tighter skirt of the dinner gown. The hem of the underskirt is decorated with a chenille-brocade border identical to the belt: gold with large black flowers and a black trim. The train has a button in the middle that allows it to be fastened to the skirt. The dress comes with a silk stole that is gathered at the ends and decorated with black tassels.
In the film, Sonya also wears black stockings and closed-toe black shoes with a low, wide heel as well as a red rhinestone necklace with a pendant.

To the right of this dress is: a midnight blue dinner gown also worn by Faye Dunaway in her role as Sonya Tuchmann.

This calf-length dinner gown with a stole has a bodice of transparent, midnight blue Chantilly lace, underlaid with cream-colored embroidered lace. The large rose petal pattern is clearly visible across the chest. The shallow V-neckline is bordered with a row of beads. The short trumpet sleeves extend to the elbows and have a dark sequin trim. The waist is emphasized with a wide velvet belt, also in midnight blue. Taffeta of the same color falls over a straight, midnight blue silk velvet skirt. The fabric is gathered at the front with an appliqué of short glass bead chains, causing the taffeta to cascade down either side. The long wide taffeta stole is also midnight blue, has a sequin trim and is gathered between the shoulder blades.

The third costume, also worn by Sonya, is: a dark fur coat and a beige dress.

The black velvet coat has a very broad miniver fur collar. The collar covers the shoulders like a cape. The same fur is used for the cuffs of this oversized garment. A wide panel of dark grey silk adorned with vertical ornamental ribbons is sewn to the hem of the knee-length velvet coat. Underneath the coat, Sonya wears a long, cream-colored dress of crêpe de chine with a deep V-neckline and long, truncated sleeves. The back features a row of fabric-covered spherical buttons that continue into the skirt. The skirt is asymmetric, with inserted godets that create soft, flowing folds. This is overlaid by a panel of the same fabric, cut shorter at the front than at the sides.
In the film, Sonya also wears a short, double-strand white pearl necklace.

The following descriptions are of the two costumes from the movie BECOMING COLETTE.

The first costume on the left is: 
a smoking jacket 
as worn by Klaus Maria Brandauer in his role as Baron Henri Gauthier-Villars.

On display is a gray silk smoking jacket with a striking jacquard pattern. The shawl lapel, sleeves and pocket flap are covered with shimmering black moiré silk. The collar has a black cord trim that runs along the lapels and down to the hem. The abstract jacquard pattern is rendered in various shades of gray and consists of ornate curved lines with offshoots and shapes that resemble floral motifs. The jacket is lined with black silk and can be closed down the front with so-called frog fasteners. These consist of two ornamental braided attachments – one with a loop and the other with a button – that are made of ribbon or cord and are stitched to the garment.
Henri Gauthier-Villars wears the jacket over a white shirt with a waistcoat, together with a plastron and cloth tailcoat trousers with galloon stripes down the side seams.

The second costume on the right is: an ice-blue evening gown as worn by Virginia Madsen in her role as Polaire.

This floor-length satin duchesse evening gown has a shoulder-wide scoop neckline and puff sleeves decorated with black ostrich feathers. The dress consists of a corsage-style bodice and a floor-length circle skirt that forms a train. The hem of the skirt is also decorated with ostrich feathers. The bodice and the front of the skirt are partially covered with black embroidered lace, on which floral motifs are loosely repeated.

Stage 4: Devil and Ms. D, Rosemary & Romy

Stage 4: On display are four costumes from three movies: The Devil and Ms. D (Germany 1988/99) and A Girl Called Rosemary (Germany 1996), both directed by Bernd Eichinger; and Romy (Germany 2009), directed by Torsten C. Fischer.

The first costume on the left is: a green evening gown as worn by Corinna Harfouch in her role as Cora Dulz in The Devil and Ms. D (Germany 1988/99), directed by Bernd Eichinger.

This floor-length corsage evening gown is made of emerald green silk satin duchesse. Rooster feathers of the same emerald green, about 20 cm in length, rise upwards from a band around the empire waist, covering the corsage bodice and protruding slightly over the décolleté. Inserted wedge-shaped pieces of fabric known as godets add folds and create a slight mermaid flare at the bottom of the form-fitting skirt. A short, rounded train completes the garment.
In the film, Cora Dulz accessorizes the dress with long duchesse evening gloves in a slightly darker emerald green that reach above the elbow.

To the right of this costume is: a gold-pleated dress as worn by Nina Hoss in her role as Rosemary in A Girl Called Rosemary (Germany 1996), directed by Bernd Eichinger.

This skin-tight halter-neck dress made of pleated gold lamé is structured around a corsage. The plunging V-neck reaches down to the waist. The underskirt forms a small train at the back. At the base of the deep neckline is a small knot adorned with a golden brooch. From this point, the pleats of the skirt radiate outwards.
In the film, Rosemary accessorizes the dress with gold, ankle-strap spike heel pumps.

The next two costumes are from the film Romy (Germany 2009), directed by Torsten C. Fischer.

The first costume on the left is: a Chanel skirt suit as worn by Jessica Schwarz in her role as Romy.

This is a light-colored, two-piece skirt suit in Chanel style. The outfit includes a smocked bow blouse of pink silk together with a jacket and skirt made of bouclé wool. The light blue-and-pink checkered material appears slightly ribbed. The jacket is box-shaped, collarless, hip-length, and features three golden buttons down the front. The shoulders are slightly padded. The high-set, narrow sleeves end in cuffs. There is one pocket placed at hip height on the right side of the jacket and two pockets on the left – one above the other. Each pocket is adorned with a golden button and features a decorative pink and dark blue trim around the opening, beneath which is a braided appliqué made of the light blue-pink wool. This decorative trim and braided appliqué also border the rest of the jacket and cuffs. The skirt is knee-length and has a slight flare. Both garments are lined with rose-colored silk.
The outfit includes a pillbox hat and a multi-strand Chanel white pearl necklace.

The costume on the far right is: a black dress.
On another occasion, Romy wears a black figure-hugging evening dress made of crêpe marocain that fastens at the back of the neck and features a large diamond-shaped cutout in the back. The dress is embroidered with a light grey diamond pattern on black ribbon, which is bordered by two rows of light grey bugle beads. This ribbon runs around the cutout, the collar and the front of the dress – where it also forms the shape of a diamond. The narrow sleeves extend to the wrists. At the side of the wrist are three small convex buttons in black. The tight, ankle-length skirt of the evening dress has a godet panel sewn into the center back, which extends into a short train.

Stage 5: The House of the Spirits

Stage 5: On display are three costumes from the movie The House of the Spirits (Germany/Denmark/Portugal 1993), directed by Bille August.

The first costume on the left is: a beige suit (coat and skirt) as worn by Vanessa Redgrave in her role as Nivea.

This dark cream-colored silk suit consists of a three-quarter-length coat and a calf-length skirt. The lapel is embroidered with chain stitched vine and leaf motifs. This gold embroidery continues underneath the lapel and ends just below it. There is a pleated panel inserted from the hip to the hem on both sides of the jacket. Around the edge of these inserts, the silk of the jacket is adorned with the same golden embroidery. The long sleeves are cut straight along the upper arm then flare from the elbow with the addition of another pleated insert. The jacket is lined with lilac crêpe georgette and ends just above the knees. The narrow beige skirt has pleats down the sides.

The costume in the middle is: a jacket and dress as worn by Winona Ryder in her role as Blanca.

The wide wrap-around jacket is made of a cream-colored cashmere wool blend. It ends below the hips and features a narrow lapel and a belt. There is one slanted pocket on the left chest and two vertical pockets under the tie-belt – one on the left and one on the right. The shoulders are slightly oversized and padded. Under this jacket, Blanca wears a brown linen jersey dress. The round neckline of the dress has a white piped trim. Four flat mother-of-pearl buttons form a vertical row down the center of the bodice. The dress has a straight skirt that ends mid-thigh.

The costume on the right is: a wedding dress as worn by Meryl Streep in her role as Clara.

The cream-colored satin-faced crêpe wedding dress with a train features a tight bodice with a peplum. The wavy, deep neckline is decorated with floral embroidery along the border and filled with a high V-neck tulle panel adorned with cream-colored embroidery of leaf and flower motifs. Transparent white beads run along the edge of the tulle at the neck. The dress is tailored with several darts. The fabric bulges along the seam of the sleeve. The full sleeves extend over the wrists and are decorated with small, convex mother-of-pearl buttons. These same buttons form a tight row from the back of the neck to the skirt. On the front, almost covered by the peplum of the bodice, is a small rectangular panel of smocked fabric. From the bottom of this panel, the skirt cascades to the floor in narrow pleats. At the back, the many deep pleats create an opulent expanse of fabric that extends into an oversized train. Over the dress, Clara wears a waist-length jacket in cream-colored crêpe satin with wide three-quarter sleeves and a small stand-up collar. In the film, Clara also wears a transparent veil that ends just over the hips.

Stage 6: Voyager

Stage 6: On display are two costumes from the movie Voyager (Germany/France/Greece 1990/91), directed by Volker Schlöndorff.

The costume on the left is: a beige pleated dress as worn by Barbara Sukowa in her role as Sabeth’s mother Hanna Piper.

This fully pleated dress in beige Honan silk is calf-length, sleeveless and has a sweeping bateau neckline. The fabric of the loose bodice covers and slightly overhangs the shoulders. The narrow pleats, each roughly a finger’s width, run from the shoulder down to the hem. The waist is emphasized with a light brown leather belt about four centimeters wide – the buckle concealed with a flap made of the same leather. In the film, Hanna accessorizes the dress with dark strap pumps with a low heel.

The costume on the right is: a blue cocktail dress as worn by Julie Delpy in her role as Sabeth (Elisabeth Piper).

This midnight blue calf-length silk dress consists of a very wide panel skirt and a sleeveless, close-fitting bodice. The yoke with its scoop neckline ends under the bust. The horizontal seam is covered with narrow panels of fabric that extend and grow wider down towards the hem, lending the so-called panel skirt its width. A petticoat is worn underneath the garment. The back of the bodice is fastened with fabric-covered buttons. A long-sleeve bolero made of the same midnight blue silk completes the dress. This short, open-front jacket has a narrow shawl collar and rounded corners.

Stage 7: Aimée & Jaguar

Stage 7: On display are two costumes from the movie Aimée & Jaguar, (Germany 1997-99), directed by Max Färberböck.

The costume on the left is: a black evening gown with Chantilly lace over-blouse as worn by Maria Schrader in her role as Felice Schragenheim.

This floor-length, form-fitting gown of softly draped silky velvet has thin straps and a plunging V-shaped neckline. The skirt falls in regular pleats. On the back, in the center, is a godet – a wedge-shaped extra piece of fabric that causes the skirt to flare and adds volume. A sheer long-sleeved waist-length blouse made from fine black Chantilly silk lace is worn over the bodice. The wearer’s light skin shows plainly through the lace, drawing attention to the chest and arms. The blouse is open at the back and ties at the neck.

The costume on the right is: a tweed pant suit as worn by Juliane Köhler in her role as Lilly Wust.

The suit jacket and pants are made of English tweed. This fine woolen fabric has a classic salt-and-pepper pattern – irregularly woven dark and light threads. The slightly tapered jacket is hip length and has tube sleeves. The jacket is fastened with a button underneath the long, wide lapel collar. The join between the collar and lapel is marked with a prominent seam and a triangular notch. On the front of the jacket, above the hem, are two patch pockets, one on the right and one on the left. There is another on the left breast. A wave-like pattern along the hand-sewn front edge of the jacket adds a sophisticated element. The pleated pants are wide-legged with cuffs. This lady’s suit is teamed with a cream-colored blouse and brown bow tie.

Stage 8: Catherine the Great

Stage 8: On display are five costumes from the movie Catherine the Great (Germany/USA 1994-96), directed by Marvin J. Chomsky and John Goldsmith.

The first costume on the left is: a blue velvet dress as worn by Jeanne Moreau in her role as Empress Elizabeth of Russia, the aunt of the future Tsar Peter III.

This regal outfit consists of a dark blue velvet mantua, skirt and stomacher. The term “mantua” refers to an 18th century open-fronted robe-like garment that drapes over the skirt and forms a train at the back. The front edges of the mantua are adorned with decorative gold trimming – which is delicate along the neckline then wider from the waist to the hem, with intertwining, thick gold braiding set against a dark green strip of moire satin ribbon with black stripes woven into it. The floor-length turquoise skirt features a jacquard pattern of dark-blue flowers. The skirt sits on a pannier, or side hoop, which extends the width of the skirt at the sides, leaving the front and back relatively flat and giving the impression of very wide hips. A triangle-shaped insert known as a stomacher fills the neckline, covering the bodice. The stomacher is decorated with gold embroidery, pearls and small gemstones that resemble diamonds. Along the edges of the neckline above the stomacher, white lace peeps out from underneath the mantua. The embroidery on the stomacher is repeated on the palm-wide cuffs witch are adorned with long lace flounces. In the film, Elizabeth accessorizes this gown with a short pearl and diamond necklace, drop earrings and several rings.

To the right of this dress is: a red three-piece silk dress as worn by Catherine Zeta-Jones in her role as Catherine.

This ceremonial dress consists of a mantua, a bodice with a stomacher, and a skirt. The stomacher is embroidered with a dense floral pattern in gold, red and blue, overlaid with fine red-thread netting. The half-length sleeves are attached to the close-fitting bodice. Very wide-cut white lace flounces extend from the hem of the sleeve down to the wrist. At the hips, the skirt sits on a relatively narrow pannier. The edges of the mantua are decorated with two double-pleated ribbons of the same red fabric as the dress, one on top of the other. From the hips, these wide ribbons run in parallel wavy lines down to the hem, where they end in a semicircular loop. At the back of the dress, loose folds form at the shoulder blades creating the beginning of a wide, flowing train.
In the film, Catherine accessorizes the dress with a choker necklace and drop earrings with small diamonds. Her dark hair is pinned up and adorned with pink rose petals.

The third costume is: Catherine’s wedding dress

This is the dress worn by Catherine at her wedding ceremony with the Russian heir to the throne – the future Tsar Peter III. The floor-length dress is made of silver lamé brocade and features an interwoven floral pattern. The sweeping neckline hangs just off the shoulder and is edged with a broad lace flounce. The tapered, corset-like bodice laces up at the back. The stomacher is decorated with silver bullion embroidery – ornamental appliqués of delicate spirals. This pattern continues down the front of the inner skirt. Attached to the short sleeves are three lace flounces, which end at the elbow. The voluminous skirt cascades over a wide pannier at the hips. The overskirt is decorated with a silver border and extends into a very long train at the back.
In the film, Catherine accessorizes the dress with a large butterfly-shaped brooch worn just below the décolleté, hanging from which are three pendants of diamonds set in silver. She also wears earrings studded with two diamonds. Her dark hair is worn up and decorated with a white bow with hanging diamond chains.

The fourth costume is: Catherine’s coronation dress.

In the film, this is the dress worn by Catherine on the occasion of her coronation in 1762. The floor-length dress of metallic ice-gray silk with an overskirt is inspired by an 18th century mantua ensemble. The shimmering fabric features a repeated pattern of the Russian two-headed eagle embroidered in gold thread. The bird has its wings spread and holds the Russian imperial scepter in its right claw and the Russian imperial orb in its left. The plunging neckline is richly trimmed with a wide lace flounce with a floral pattern, decorated with sequins and gemstones. The dramatically tapered corset-like bodice laces up at the back. Two of the gold two-headed eagles are embroidered one above the other on the bodice – the top one hidden under the flounce. Three layers of lace flounces adorn the half-length sleeves. The pleated skirt and the open-front overskirt both sit on a large, oval-shaped pannier at the hips. The overskirt is decorated with a narrow silver brocade edge border and transitions into an oversized train at the back. In the film, Catherine wears a large round crown or a flat diadem with this dress. She accessorizes with large diamond earrings and a choker necklace. The long, weighty coronation chain of large round diamonds rests upon her shoulders.


(BB_122)
The last of Catherine's costumes displayed on this stage is:
a day dress with cape
This three-piece light-blue day dress made of cotton damask has cream-colored vertical stripes interwoven with a pattern of golden-yellow and golden-brown flowers and vines. It consists of a mantua, stomacher and skirt. The edges of mantua feature a decorative ruffle border in the same fabric. The mantua has a deep, square neckline, below which is the decorative stomacher. In the film, the stomacher that goes with this day dress is embroidered with leaf and vine motifs in blue and gold; the stomacher in the exhibition features light blue and cream-colored horizontal stripes. The loosely falling sleeves have wide cuffs with lace flounces that start just below the elbow. The floor-length skirt sits on an oval pannier at the hips and the mantua forms a short train at the back. During the alms offering, Catherine wears a burgundy silk cape with a large hood and long train over the dress. A decorative border runs along the edge of the hood and down both sides of the cape’s opening to the hem. This border is roughly a hand's width and features flower and vine embroidered motifs in gold and silver. Ruffled fabric runs down both sides of the border.

Stage 9, part 1: Fontane Effi Briest, Berlin Alexanderplatz, Veronika Voss

Stage 9: Five costumes are on display from three Rainer Werner Fassbinder films: One costume from Effi Briest (FRG 1972-74), two costumes from Berlin Alexanderplatz (FRG 1979/80), two costumes from Veronika Voss (FRG 1981/82).

The first costume on the left:
Velvet suit (jacket and skirt) with a blouse and straw hat as worn by Hanna Schygulla in her role as Effi Briest.

This outfit is a dark-brown panne velvet suit comprising a three-quarter-length jacket and a floor-length skirt, paired with a white voile blouse. Panne velvet is an iridescent material made from polyester with a vibrant, plush appearance. The jacket, with cuffs of the same color, is embroidered with a square-shaped cross-stitch detail. The waist is decorated with two so-called frog buttons: ornamental loops and knots of applied braid. The voile blouse of fine-threaded cotton has a large collar with a pleated ruffled edge, and the lacy cuffs of the blouse emerge from the jacket sleeves. The outfit is completed by a brown straw hat decorated with egret feathers, velvet bows, and a russet tulle veil.

The following is a description of two costumes from the film BERLIN ALEXANDERPLATZ.

The first costume on the left:
Three-piece wool suit as worn by Günter Lamprecht in his role as Franz Biberkopf.

The suit consists of a brown patterned jacket and vest and a darker, pinstriped trousers. Underneath the vest is a light-colored pull-on shirt with a detachable collar and very narrow tucks around the neckline. The accessories include a narrow, russet silk tie with white diamonds and dots, and a Homburg hat – a stiff, elegant gentleman’s felt hat with a high crown and a round, slightly curled brim.

The next costume to the right is:
White dress and shell-pink straw hat as worn by Barbara Sukowa in her role as Mieze.
This sleeveless, knee-length dress is made from cream-colored muslin – a fine, loose-flowing fabric. The V-neckline in front and back is embellished with rose-colored lace panels. A bow is attached underneath the bust. The skirt begins at the hips, with two flounces to either side, decorated with lace.
Barbara Baum once explained that this light and floaty dress worn by the character Mieze should make her seem like an apparition, like a ray of light. The outfit is topped off by a shell-pink straw hat adorned with a red ribbon.

The next two costumes are from the film VERONIKA VOSS.

On the left:
An evening gown and hat
also worn by Rosel Zech.

This elegant black knee-length dress with a V-neckline is made of crêpe – a silk-like fabric with a finely crinkled surface. Just below the left shoulder is an ornamental appliqué of silver bead, sequin and rhinestone, embroidered in the shape of a blossom branch. The sleeves come to a flare at the wrist and end in a cuff. The outfit also includes a black silk cape made of cloqué – a double-faced fabric that produces a jacquard effect. The cape is lined with cream-colored satin and has a shoulder yoke with two wide bands at the end that can be wrapped around the neck like a scarf. The back of the cape extends down into a blunt point. A dark clip-on hat in the shape of a stylized flower serves as an accessory.

On the right:
A gold lamé evening gown as worn by Rosel Zech in her role as Veronika Voss.

This gown is made from an original 1930s fabric. The brown-gold shimmering material is interwoven with metal threads and features a pattern of countless golden circles with dark centers. The high-neck evening dress has broad, batwing sleeves that end in wide, diamond-shaped cuffs that taper towards the back of the hand and elbow, and are fastened on the underside with lamé-covered buttons. The fabric is gathered in the middle of the chest and just below the waist. From these gathered sections, folds radiate out in all directions. The collar fastens at the back of the neck, forming the top of a deep triangular cutout in the back. From the bottom point of the V, a tight row of lamé-covered buttons run down into the skirt. The tight-fitting, ankle-length dress extends at the back to form a train with an attached wrist loop.

Stage 9, part 2: Lola

Stage 9: On display are five costumes from the movie Lola (Federal Republic of Germany 1981), directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The first costume on the left is: suit, shirt and vest as worn by Mario Adorf in his role as Schuckert.

This three-piece suit consists of anthracite-colored jacket, tailored trousers with galloon stripes and a wine-red vest. The jacket has a shawl lapel and cuffs. It also has two flap pockets and a welt pocket on the breast for the white handkerchief. Underneath the double-breasted lapel vest, Schuckert wears a white shirt with collor and a tie with a vertically-divided two-tone pattern: one half is wine-red, the other is white with small wine-red squares.

The costume to the right of that is: red corsage gown as worn by Barbara Sukowa in her role as Lola.

This figure-hugging strapless gown adorned with sequins and lace has a pattern of vines and palm-sized flowers. The sequins set off the dress with flashes of sliver. The skirt divides in the middle around mid-thigh and the two sides slant outwards down to the knee. Three layers of organza ruffles in different shades of red emerge from underneath the hem. This sheer, iridescent fabric lengthens the dress to the calf. The gown is paired with a red chiffon scarf – a sheer material made from silk. The scarf is worn over the shoulders as a stole, with both sides nearly touching the floor. In the movie, Lola also wears red velvet elbow-length gloves.

Show gown for the “Capri-Fischer” performance also worn by Barbara Sukowa.

This strapless, calf-length corset dress is made from black tulle with gold polka dots. The double-layer A-line dress has an a-symmetrical hem which forms a short train at the back. The matching loose-fitting shoulder cape of transparent tulle reaches down to the waist, adorned with the same gold polka dots.

Summer dress with underdress and petticoat also worn by Barbara Sukowa.

This gossamer summer dress with a corset underdress is made from white organdy – an almost transparent cotton fabric. Here, it is decorated with dark-blue flower-shaped embroidery. The dress has truncated sleeves and a Peter Pan collar of white organza. The bodice fastens at the front with five glass buttons set with a single rhinestone each. The broadly flared skirt keeps its shape and volume thanks to the petticoat beneath. Around the waist is a thin, dark belt with a dark buckle. In the film, Lola wears the dress with a white fascinator decorated with tulle and rhinestones. It has a figure-eight shape and sits on both sides of the head. In the center of the eight is a kind of brooch.

Suit with fur trim as worn by Barbara Sukowa.

This black woolen suit is decorated with embroidered black dots. The tight-fitting hip-length jacket has a wide, scalloped lapel collar of white organza. The narrow three-quarter length sleeves end in long, broad cuffs of fluffy white fox fur. The jacket is paired with a calf-length pencil skirt with a “Dior vent” – a slit with a piece of fabric inserted behind it. The dark suit is set off with a shining string of pearls with a rhinestone clasp.

Stage 9, part 3: Die Ehe der Maria Braun

Stage 9: On display are four costumes from the movie The Marriage of Maria Braun (FRG 1978), directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The first costume on the left is:
a check suit and straw hat with net veil as worn by Hanna Schygulla in her role as Maria Braun.

This woolen suit has a very tight black-and-white check pattern known as “shepherd’s check.” The hip-length jacket with peplum has four large buttons and the pencil skirt is calf-length with a “Dior vent” – a slit with a piece of fabric inserted behind it. Two pocket flaps are stitched onto the front of the jacket, one on the left and one on the right, at hip height. The lapel and cuffs are covered in dark-gray velvet. The accessories are a palm-sized black cloth camellia close to the left lapel, and a wide-brimmed black straw hat, embellished with a black coarse-mesh tulle veil with white dots.

To the right of that is:
Winter coat also as worn by Hanna Schygulla.

This cream-colored, calf-length woolen tent coat has a wide fit and no fastening. The long raglan sleeves are truncated, stopping just before the wrist. The wide over-the-shoulder shawl collar and large cuffs are both made of ocelot fur, which gives the coat an air of chic elegance.

The third costume along is: Blue evening gown with lace reverse over-blouse also as worn by Hanna Schygulla.

This dark-blue satin dress is calf-length and has thin straps. The skirt features several godets around the bottom – these are additional wedge-shaped pieces of fabric that cause the skirt to flare. The godets are decorated in fine tulle lace with a pattern of large flowers and leaves – the same lace used for the long-sleeved reverse bolero, which is worn open at the back. The edges of the blouse are decorated with glass beads, and the clasp at the neck features a single rhinestone. The wearer’s light skin shows plainly through the sheer fabric, drawing attention to the chest and arms.

On the far right is:
Post-war dress, fur cap and jacket as worn by Hanna Schygulla.

This close-fitting, knee-length woolen dress is in two different shades of blue. The three-quarter-length sleeves are light blue at the front and dark blue at the back. The sides of the dress are dark blue, with a broad vertical pale-blue band running down the center. Where the two colors meet to the right and left of this center band, there is an appliqued decoration from shoulder to hem of a winding vine with leaves. On the dark background, the leaves are light; on the light background, dark and light leaves alternate. The vines come close together at the waist. The neckline of the dress cuts straight across from shoulder to shoulder. The dress is paired with a broad, dark-brown velour faux krimmer jacket, which can be fastened by way of two buttons. Its broad lapels reach all the way down to the hem. The accessories are a brown felt cap and a turquoise woolen scarf. The cap is covered with grayish-brown rabbit fur and decorated with brown felt leaves, reminiscent of animal ears.

Stage 9, part 4: Lili Marleen & Querelle

Stage 9: On display are two costumes from the movie Lili Marleen (FRG 1980) and three costumes from the movie Querelle (FRG/France 1982), both directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The first costume, on the left is:
a silver lamé stage costume as worn by Hanna Schygulla in her role as Willie Bunterberg.

This close-fitting asymmetric silver lamé gown was made from authentic 1920s fabric. The sleeves are very wide at the top and become much narrower lower down – so-called “mutton sleeves.” The shoulders are heavily padded and additionally emphasized by a pleated ribbon in the same fabric as the dress. The plunging V-neck is edged with a band of silver sequin flowering vines. Additional sequined borders cling to the hips and decorate the walking slit at the front of the skirt. At the back, the skirt comes together in a floor-length train. The ensemble is crowned by a silver lamé turban, also decorated with sequined vines.

The Lili Marleen gown no longer sparkles the way it did in the movie, as the silver thread discolored due to oxidized in a Munich tailor’s studio, where the gown was displayed on a dressmaker’s dummy for 30 years.

Reich Chancellery costume as worn by Hanna Schygulla

This white woolen suit with embroidered dots consists of a three-quarter-length jacket and a knee-length pencil skirt with a side slit. The suit is paired with a so-called “casaque” – a three-quarter-length lady’s blouse of patterned crêpe de chine with an elegantly ruffled waist and heavily padded shoulders. The blouse is made of an authentic 1930s fabric with a floral pattern that resembles a dense carpet of daisies. The flowers vary in size and have brown-gold centers, white and blue petals and inconsistent black contours. In some places, golden leaves glimmer among the flowers. The neckline and the drapes of the blouse are decorated with gold-bead embroidery. The lapel features a large flower formed from black lace, and the elegant ensemble is crowned by a black felt hat with white arctic fox fur.

The next costumes are from the movie QUERELLE.

The first costume on the left is:
a sailor suit and hat as worn by Brad Davis in his role as Querelle.

This three-part sailor suit consists of a long-sleeved white sailor’s shirt with a wide V-neck and a navy-blue button-on naval collar. The white lapels arch toward the shoulders and merge with the navy-blue collar, meeting at right angles around the back. The collar is edged with three white parallel stripes running up over the shoulders and down the back. On the left sleeve are two emblems: a blue star, and underneath that a red number 4. Underneath the sailor’s shirt is a so-called marinière, a long-armed cotton shirt with horizontal blue and white stripes. The trousers are straight-legged and have a button fly. The outfit is topped off with a white cotton sailor’s hat with a red pompom and a stiff band of black rep with narrow red piping. On the hat band is the name of the ship, “Vengeur,” in golden lettering. The hat is flattened on each side by a white leather strap that runs across the crown.

The costume in the center is:
a snake-print dress as worn by Jeanne Moreau in her role as Lysiane.

This ankle-length translucent evening gown is made of black devoré (also known as “burnout”) with a golden snake-print pattern. Devoré is a fabric technique, particularly used on velvets, where a mixed-fiber material undergoes a chemical process, using an acid paste to “burn out” the natural fibers leaving behind a semi-transparent pattern. On this dress, thumbnail-sized patches of velvet remain. The gown’s deep V-neck is edged with dark ostrich feathers with applied gold effects. A black lace insert with gold dots fills the neckline to the throat. The skirt has a train at the back, with a hand loop.

The costume on the right is:
a navy uniform and captain’s hat as worn by Franco Nero in his role as Lieutenant Seblon.

This cream-colored woolen dress uniform for naval officers features a single-breasted jacket with a stand-up collar and four patch pockets with a single golden button on each flap. The pants are straight-legged. The jacket is embellished with loose-hanging gold braid that extends from the right epaulette to the lapel. The navy-blue cuffs feature three gold stripes, with the top one forming a diamond shape. This decoration is repeated on the epaulettes. The uniform also includes a sweeping navy-blue cape with epaulettes and matt gold braid. On the front of the cape are six golden buttons with an anchor relief design. The uniform is topped off by a captain’s hat of cream-colored wool with a black patent peak. Above the peak is a golden strap and a badge featuring a large anchor.

Tactile station: Berlin Alexanderplatz

On the board in front of you is a sketch for a lightweight dress as worn by Barbara Sukowa in her role as Mieze in the movie Berlin Alexanderplatz, produced in 1979/80 and directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The board is divided into four sections:
On the bottom left is information about the dress in large black lettering on a squared background reminiscent of a notebook. To the right of that is the same text in braille on a rectangular, black background:

“A gossamer dress of pink muslin with pink tulle lace panels. Underneath is an authentic 1920s slip trimmed with light-gray crocheted lace.”

The QR code is located at the bottom center of the board within a tactile square frame.
The upper section contains the original sketch of the sleeveless dress, presented in relief. On the left is the front view, and further right is the back view.

The bodice and skirt are made from pink muslin – a lightweight cotton fabric. The shoulders are lightly ruffled. The V-neckline on both the front and back features a lace insert. The knee-length skirt has two layered flounces on either side, with the top layer shorter than the bottom one.
Dotted lines between the front and back views of the dress lead to the text. Next to a vertical dividing line, in the top right-hand third of the board, is a representation of the matching hat in profile: a shell-pink straw hat made of several woven rows, adorned with a dark-red ribbon.

Underneath you can feel a sample of pink tulle from Barbara Baum with a floral pattern.

Tactile station: Lola

The board in front of you shows a sketch for a summer dress as worn by Barbara Sukowa as Lola in the eponymously named movie, produced in 1981 and directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The board is divided into four sections:
On the bottom left is information about the dress in large black lettering on a squared background reminiscent of a notebook. To the right of that is the same text in braille on a rectangular, black background:

“A gossamer 1950s-style dress of white organdy with dark-blue flower-shaped embroidery.”

The QR code is located at the bottom center of the board within a tactile square frame.

The upper section contains the original sketch of the dress, presented in relief. To the left is the front view, to the right is the back view.
The close-fitting overdress of organza with a Peter Pan collar is worn over a corset underdress. Organza is a sheer, iridescent fabric made from silk. A belt with a tie front encircles the waist, where a wide flared skirt begins. This keeps its shape and volume thanks to the full petticoat worn beneath.
Horizontal lines between the front and back views of the dress lead to the text in the middle.
On the other side of a vertical dividing line, in the upper right-hand third of the board is a detail of the floral pattern on organdy: four large flowers arranged in a square with five smaller ones in between them, arranged in the shape of a plus sign.

Underneath you can feel a sample of the original organdy with the flower-shaped embroidery used for this summer dress – a stiff, translucent fabric made from cotton.

Tactile station: Lili Marleen

The board in front of you shows a sketch for a silver lamé evening gown as worn by Hanna Schygulla in the movie Lili Marleen, produced in 1980 and directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

The board is divided into four sections:
On the bottom left is information about the evening gown in large black lettering on a squared background reminiscent of a notebook. To the right of that is the same text in braille on a rectangular, black background:

“Close-fitting asymmetric 1940s-style gown made from authentic 1920s fabric. The décolleté, hips and walking slit are decorated with borders of silver sequins.”

The QR code is located at the bottom center of the board within a tactile square frame.

The upper section contains the original sketch of the dress, presented in relief. On the left is the front view, and further right is the back view.
It is a close-fitting asymmetric dress with a floor-length train, strongly emphasized shoulders, and pleated mutton sleeves that narrow toward the wrist.

Dotted lines between the front and back views of the dress lead to the text.
Next to a vertical dividing line, in the upper right-hand third of the board is a presentation of the headgear in profile: a silver lamé turban with sequined borders that covers the wearer’s hair entirely.

Underneath you can feel a sample of the original fabric used for this glamorous evening gown. Lamé is a lightweight material containing thin strands of metal, in this case, silver.

Display case: Fathers and Sons, Burning Secret, Buddenbrooks

This display case contains work material from the three films Fathers and Sons, Burning Secret and Buddenbrooks.

First, some background information on Fathers and Sons. This TV miniseries from 1984-86 follows the rise and fall of the fictitious Deutz family and their paint and tar factory – which grew into the company IG Farben and became a cog in the Nazi killing machine. Filming locations for the series included Munich, Heidelberg and Prague. Monika Jacobs supported Barbara Baum in this project as her assistant. Some of the costumes were made at the Theaterkunst costume workshop in Berlin. Materials relating to this TV drama are displayed in the left-hand section of the case. In the top left are two photos: one shows Barbara Baum in a train compartment being made up as an extra. She is wearing a light-colored outfit, accessorized in the second photo with a wide-brimmed, elegant sun hat. To the right of these photos are some perforated and bound A4 sheets featuring a handwritten note that says: “Shooting schedule for Geheimrat Deutz Burt Lancaster from March 15, 1985.” Next to this are two color photos of Laura Morante and Katharina Thalbach, both in elegant evening gowns. There is also a newspaper clipping from the German paper Die Zeit dated November 21, 1969, with the headline “A Family from Essen” and a black-and-white photograph of the Krupp family, which Baum used as research material. Displayed in a folder is a historical photo of a family member of the director, Sinkel: an elderly gentleman with white hair, a white mustache and glasses with round lenses. On the left, roughly in the middle, is a list of Burt Lancaster’s measurements. Next to this on the right is a spiral-bound notebook showing a sketch for the ice-blue dress and a photograph of Julie Christie wearing the garment. This is followed by fabric samples for the men’s suits in shades of gray and brown plus receipts from the purchase of accessories, including shoes, hats and an orthopedic corset. The latter was intended to make Christian Körner “somewhat thinner” for the scene where he gives his statement at the Nuremberg Trials. At the bottom are photos taken on set: two show Julie Christie on the set in a gold lamé dress and one is a black-and-white family photo from the film, with Burt Lancaster sat in the middle.

The middle section of the display case contains materials from Burning Secret – a movie adaptation of a Stefan Zweig novel. One of Barbara Baum’s biggest challenges with this project was convincing Faye Dunaway of her costume ideas. Baum travelled to New York, showed the actress her designs and took her along to specialist retailer stores. This marked the beginning of a wonderful collaboration. The designer would go on to receive a Golden Osella for Best Costume Design at the 1988 Venice International Film Festival.

The focal point of the display is a sketchpad, around which several other documents are displayed. The sketch is of Baum’s design for the red dinner dress worn by Faye Dunaway in her role as Sonya. The dress is sketched from the front and the back. A color photo displays Faye Dunaway wearing the finished garment.
Above the sketch is the first page of the costume plot, with handwritten notes on lined paper. A costume plot is created on the basis of the screenplay and is required for every main character. On page 26 of the screenplay, to the left of the costume plot, colored markings have been made: in pink for Sonya, blue for Edmund, and yellow for the extras. Baum has noted down the costumes that will be required scene by scene – depending on the time of day, season, and whether it is set inside or outside. Following on clockwise, research materials are displayed in the form of drawings and photographs – including those of children's clothing from the 1910s. These are accompanied by Baum’s correspondence with make-up artist Jane Carvell regarding the coordination of accessories and hairstyles. Following on is a list of some of the costume purchases, including shoes and jewelry. Attached to the list is a photo of Faye Dunaway sitting on an antique sofa wearing a black velvet coat with a wide white-and-gray fur collar made from Russian squirrel.

In the right-hand section of the display case are materials relating to Barbara Baum’s work on the film Buddenbrooks. Buddenbrooks is a movie remake of the Thomas Mann novel of the same name, which tells of the rise and fall of a German merchant family at the dawn of the modern era. The costumes were made in Berlin, London and Rome. In Rome, Barbara Baum discovered fabrics from Visconti’s 1963 movie IL GATTOPARDO (The Leopard), which she was given permission to use for Gerda’s red ball gown. At the top are prints from the costume plot for Tony Buddenbrook (played by Jessica Schwarz) and a costume list with handwritten notes for the role of Gerda. Underneath is Barbara Baum’s copy of the screenplay, with costume plot markings for the individual characters. The title page is displayed separately to the left of the screenplay. On it, Baum has written “my screenplay” inside a stylized little tree – her trademark doodle. The costume list is compiled using the costume plots and lists all the costumes required for each role – including the calculated costs for constructing, purchasing or pulling these garments from stock. Displayed in the top right is the sketched design of a men’s shoe for Mark Waschke (who plays Thomas Buddenbrook) together with leather samples. To the right of this are photos from the movie set in Cologne, showing heavily laden clothes rails in large halls and a full rack of shoes – including those made for Mark Waschke. In another photo, Barbara Baum presents Gerda’s peacock blue dress. Four photos show Barbara Baum putting the finishing touches to the costumes once they are on the actors. In one photo she squats behind Iris Berben, in the role of Bethsy, straightening a long, off-the-shoulder gown.

Display case: House of the Spirits, Girl Called Rosemary, The Devil and Ms D

This display case shows examples of Barbara Baum’s costume work for the movies The House of the Spirits, A Girl Called Rosemary, and The Devil and Ms. D.

First, some background information on The House of the Spirits. This movie adaptation of Isabel Allende’s autobiographical epic recounts the fate of the Chilean Trueba family spanning three generations. The movie’s cast includes Vanessa Redgrave, Winona Ryder, Glenn Close, Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons. Baum’s costumes were made in London and Berlin and reflect fashion trends from the 1920s through to the 1970s. Work material for the movie is displayed in the left-hand section of the long display case. In the center of the display sits an open sketchpad showing four sketches for the design of the wedding dress worn by Meryl Streep in her role as Clara. A black-and-white photograph shows a historical wedding dress, the long train draped around the bride’s feet. In the upper left corner of the display case is costume designer Bina Daigeler’s open copy of the screenplay, featuring sketches, Polaroids of the costumes, and handwritten notes. Attached to an A4 sheet of paper are six fabric swatches for the costumes of Blanca, played by Winona Ryder. Next to this is a handwritten costume plot for Clara and a piece of lace for the veil of her wedding dress. Also displayed are fabric swatches in gray, gray-blue and brown for the costumes of Esteban Trueba, played by Jeremy Irons, as well as photos of the actor’s fitting in London and Esteban’s costume list. Below the sketchpad is a costume list and handwritten costume plot for the character of Ferula, played by Glenn Close. Attached to this are three photos of the fitting. A team photo from the set shows director Bille August standing between Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons, alongside many more of the movie’s cast and crew.

In the middle of the display case is material used for the TV movie A Girl Called Rosemary – a remake of Rolf Thiele’s 1958 movie adaptation of a true story. In Bernd Eichinger’s first directorial work, Nina Hoss plays Rosemary Nitribitt – a woman who tried to make big money as a luxury prostitute in Frankfurt in the 1950s and paid a high price as a result. For the leading actress, Barbara Baum designed figure-hugging garments in the new fashion of the 1950s. One of the costume designer’s film history muses for this character was style icon Marilyn Monroe.
A black-and-white research copy showing Monroe in the 1953 movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes forms the focal point of this display. The photograph is a portrait of the actress from the head to the hip. She wears a shimmering, elegant halter-neck dress with a deep V-neck that reaches down to the waist. Monroe gazes into the camera seductively. Above and to the left of this photo are sketches for a woman’s suit – a straight-cut knee-length skirt and a very narrow-waisted blazer – drawn here with a deep neckline. To the right of this is a copy of a black-and-white photo of the real Rosemary Nitribitt. It shows her sitting sideways in the driver’s seat of a car, leaning forward with her left leg crossed over the right – a cigarette in hand. Her outfit resembles the suit in the sketch. Below the photo are sketches of the pink “Ritz” dress for Rosemary. This floor-length halter-neck dress hugs the figure and emphasizes the narrow waist. The sketches are accompanied by handwritten notes. Also arranged around the Marilyn Monroe photo are three color photos from film shoots with Nina Hoss. In these photos she is wearing the pleated gold lamé dress, which is very similar to the halter-neck dress worn by Monroe. At the base of the deep neckline is a small knot. The many folds of the ankle-length, fully pleated dress radiate outwards from this point. In one of the photos, Nina wears a long dark brown fur coat with a wide collar and sleeves.

The right-hand section of the display case is dedicated to The Devil and Ms. D – the movie adaption of a novel written by Helmut Krausser. The leading roles in the movie are played by Corinna Harfouch and Til Schweiger. For this project, Barbara Baum designed contemporary costumes. Her creations for Cora Dulz, played by Corinna Harfouch, are particularly effective in reflecting the character’s development – from conservative psychologist to man-eating vamp. The most iconic of Cora’s costumes is the emerald green evening gown. At the center of this display are the various samples of emerald green material that were tested for the dress. From top to bottom, these materials are: silk, velvet, sequins, and feathers. To the left of the materials is a photograph from a costume consultation with Bernd Eichinger. On the right next to the costume plot are two color photos of Til Schweiger dummies on the roof of a high-rise during shooting. Underneath is a photograph of the actor during a fitting for a light-blue jacket, the sleeves of which are not yet attached. The actor looks directly into the camera with his arms folded across his chest. On the bottom left are four photographs: Three show the two leading actors while filming on the rooftops of Frankfurt. In one, the iconic Trade Fair Tower reaches up into a partly cloudy sky. The fourth photo shows Corinna Harfouch standing in front of a curtain wearing the green evening gown. An aluminum stepladder leans against the wall to her right. Harfouch rests her left hand on her hip and holds a cigarette in her right.

To the right of the material samples is a spiral-bound notebook with a handwritten costume list for the movie extras. Below are Polaroids and photos of a fitting with Corinna Harfouch. The dress only found its final form once on the body of the actress. In two of the photos it is very low cut and off the shoulder. A strip of fabric about ten centimeters wide encircles the neckline and the upper arms. The Polaroids beneath show the dress sleeveless and off the shoulder. In one of the photos, a wide strip of fabric runs from the right shoulder to under the left armpit. Another photo in the lower right corner shows the tube bodice of the dress covered with the emerald green band of feathers.

Display case: Catherine the Great, Aimée & Jaguar, Voyager

This display case contains work material from the movies Catherine the Great, Aimee & Jaguar and Voyager.

The two-part television drama Catherine the Great is about the rise to power of the young Prussian princess Sophie, who became the Russian Tsarina Catherine the Great. Catherine was the breakthrough role for Catherine Zeta-Jones, who was still unknown on the international stage at the time. Supporting roles were filled by Jeanne Moreau and Omar Sharif. The opulent rococo costumes were made in Berlin, Rome and Vienna, and some of the scenes were shot in Studio Babelsberg in Potsdam, by Berlin. A selection of Barbara Baum’s work material for this movie can be found in the left-hand third of this display case. On the left edge are several photographs. One shows a gown of Catherine’s that has a flared, light-colored skirt with a floral pattern, worn over a hooped petticoat. It is paired with a short apricot-colored mantua with a stomacher. The sleeves flare out at the elbow and end in a flounce of white lace. Photographs below show a lace corset on an antique dressmaker’s dummy and close-ups of the floral fabric interwoven with green. To the right of these photos are two handwritten A4 sheets of paper. One is the costume list for Elizabeth, played by Jeanne Moreau; the other is a list of work material required during shooting. The items entered include two ironing boards, two irons, a washer-dryer, and 14 clothes racks. At the center of this part of the display case are fabric swatches for Elizabeth’s and Catherine’s costumes. The fabrics for Elizabeth have large patterns in ocher, brown and black; Catherine’s are mainly sheer gray, light yellow and light brown. One of the samples is the silver lamé brocade as used in the wedding gown. On the bottom edge are pages from the working script, featuring Polaroids of the costumes for Elizabeth and Catherine.
To the right of that are three photographs of Catherine Zeta-Jones trying on a glossy apricot-colored rococo gown. In one of them she is wearing a corset, slip and hooped petticoat. Two more photographs show an apricot-colored lace-up corset. In one of the pictures the corset is laid out, in the other it is displayed on an antique dressmaker’s dummy and paired with a white hooped petticoat that flares out at the sides.

The middle display case is dedicated to Barbara Baum’s work for Aimee & Jaguar. The film is based on the true story of two women who fell in love in Nazi Germany. They were a Jewish woman called Felice (or “Jaguar,” played by Maria Schrader) and Lilly, (or “Aimee,” played by Juliane Köhler), the wife of a Nazi officer. The film was shot in Germany and Poland from April to June of 1997. The movie premiered in competition at the 1999 Berlin International Film Festival. The two main characters each received a “Silver Bear.”
On the top left are two A4 pages taken from a costume plot for the character of Lilly, with some brief handwritten notes. Next to that are two photographs of Juliane Köhler and Maria Schrader during shooting. Lower down is a sheet of paper with a sketch for Lilly’s dress of viscose crêpe. On the left is the front view of the dress, on the right the back view. To the side of and underneath the back view are the following handwritten notes “Full in the back: either three panels or a slight bell!” and “Lilly. Viscose crêpe from London, rose-beige. Needs a patterned fabric insert in the front.”
On the right-hand side are six fabric samples for Lilly’s costumes: two beige swatches for a pair of pants; two patterned taupe materials for polo shirts; and two pieces of the same fabric, one blue and one undyed. Next to that is a small strip of white chiffon with a spiral pattern. Underneath the swatches are four photographs of the actresses on the film set and in wardrobe. Three are of Juliane Köhler: one in a dress of viscose crêpe; one in a light-colored trench coat; and one in a brown tweed pant suit with a cream-colored blouse. The photograph on the bottom right shows Maria Schrader in a floor-length evening gown made from silky black velvet with a black Chantilly lace over-blouse. In her right hand she holds a cigarette, in her left a glass of sparkling wine. Underneath the photograph is a sample of the black velvet.

The right-hand third of the display case displays work material for Voyager, based on the novel Homo Faber by Max Frisch. The leading roles are played by Sam Shepard, Julie Delpy, and Barbara Sukowa. Shepard’s suits were designed by Armani, while the costumes for Sukowa and Delpy were made at Theaterkunst Berlin. As she often did, Barbara Baum sent the sketches by fax to the costumier with notes and questions on how the ideas should be implemented.
The top right section is dominated by an open black folder, which contains the shooting script. Four Polaroids have been glued inside, along with detailed handwritten notes on the costumes for Sam Shepard as Walter Faber, Barbara Sukowa as Hanna, and August Zirner as Joachim. To the left are two Polaroids of Shepard. In the top one he is standing in a desert landscape. He is wearing a white sleeveless undershirt with sweat marks in the chest area, gray pants with brown suspenders, and dusty shoes. On his head is a gray hat with a brim. To the left of the file is an A4 page with the design for Barbara Sukowa’s beige pleated dress of wild silk. Underneath, a photo shows the actress being fitted for the dress. Under that photo, to the right, is a lined piece of paper to which six fabric swatches have been attached – for the beige pleated dress and the cocktail dress. In the bottom right corner is a Polaroid of Julie Delpy during a fitting for the blue dress. To the right of the fabric swatches is Baum’s sketch of the dress. She noted on it by hand: “Rolled pleats in the skirt; nice flare.” This display case finishes with a fax in the bottom right. This was sent by Barbara Baum from London to Christa Hedderich at Theaterkunst Munich: “My ‘difficult birth’ – the cocktail dress with short jacket! Maybe the dress shouldn’t have such a deep neckline for the fitting. I think the bodice of the dress should be worked into the skirt about 15 to 20 centimeters deep, over organza. Perhaps stitch it into the seam? What do you lovely ladies think? Hugs and kisses from...” The fax is signed with a sketch of a woman’s head with wavy hair, two large, alert eyes and a smiling mouth. At the side is a star-shaped earring. This little doodle looks rather like the crown of a tree with a face (Baum means “tree” in German). To the right and left of it, Baum placed her initials.

Display case: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

This display case contains design sketches for five movies by Rainer Werner Fassbinder. From left to right these are: The Marriage of Maria Braun, Berlin Alexanderplatz, Lili Marleen, Lola and Querelle.
“For his first historical movie, Effi Briest, Fassbinder was on the lookout for a professional costume designer. Actress Hanna Schygulla proposed Barbara Baum. At their first meeting, Fassbinder didn’t request any references from Baum; instead he asked her detailed questions about costume ideas. She surprised him by giving very precise answers. Spontaneously, the two of them began discussing the entire screenplay. This was the beginning of an intensive working relationship. Fassbinder had so much faith in Baum’s work that he never asked to see her sketches and designs until shooting began. She worked almost exclusively for him until his death in 1982.“

1st film: The Marriage of Maria Braun.
Here there are several sketches on tracing paper of costumes for Hanna Schygulla in the title role. One sheet of paper shows a short-sleeved close-fitting dress with a narrow V-neck and a slightly flared skirt. Affixed to the paper are fabric swatches – one black, one red check. On another sheet is a sketch for a suit with a flared calf-length skirt and a short black jacket, also flared. A larger sheet below features the design for the blue evening dress with a long-sleeved lace reverse bolero. The calf-length, figure-hugging dress has spaghetti straps. Under the knee, the tight skirt features several lace godets – wedge-shaped fabric inserts that cause the skirt to flare. Next to the sketch is the comment: “Flare with and without lace.”


2nd film: Berlin Alexanderplatz.
On the cover of a black notebook Barbara Baum noted that she was working on the costumes for Berlin Alexanderplatz during the shooting of “Maria Braun.” To the right of the notebook is the design for a suit for Günter Lamprecht in the role of Franz Biberkopf. On the tracing paper next to the sketch is a note from Baum: “Make suit three times due to accident. He still has two arms. Plus another one for after the arm is amputated. Book 7, Image 99.” Next to the sketch is a Polaroid showing Günter Lamprecht’s torso. Around his middle is an orthopedic device for concealing his arm. The bottom edge of the display case features two designs for women’s dresses. They show sketches for the role of Eva, played by Hanna Schygulla. The dress has a V-neck and long, flared sleeves. The black skirt is also flared. Two fabric samples are attached to the left-hand side of the sheet. The adjoining sketch shows the dress worn by Barbara Sukowa in her role as Mieze. A tactile graphic for this dress can be found in front of Stage 9, to the left. The graphic on the left is the front view, and on the right the back view, somewhat smaller. A sketch of a straw hat with a broad ribbon can be found in the bottom right corner. The design is a sleeveless, knee-length dress. The straight-cut bodice goes down to the hips, where the lightweight skirt begins. It is fashioned from two flounces with wedge-shaped inserts. Next to that, Baum has noted: “Light pink tulle lace.” The deep V-neckline features an insert of the same lace. A small bow adorns the bottom point of the V-neckline. Two fabric samples are also attached to the left-hand edge of this sheet. On top is the pink tulle lace, underneath a piece of white muslin.

3rd film: Lili Marleen.
On display are three costume designs for Hanna Schygulla in her role as Lili, and a book of notes on the film. The first sketch shows a close-fitting halter-neck evening gown with a short train. A swatch of blue fabric is attached to the left-hand edge of the design. Baum noted: “Evening gown of royal-blue crêpe de chine with fine gold threads; embroidered ornamentation and contours: midnight-blue sequins.” To the right of the sketch is Baum’s ring-bound notebook. It lies open and inside is a photograph of Hanna Schygulla wearing this dress in the scene at the Sportpalast in 1942. Underneath the notebook are two more designs. The one on the left has the front view of the silver-lamé evening gown, very large in the center. A tactile graphic for this dress can be found in front of Stage 9, to the right. To the left of the large front view are smaller sketches of the back view; to the right is a representation of the matching headgear in profile. Written above that are a series of notes: “Sportpalast 1944, last appearance, shooting day Aug. 11, 1980. The dress must be figure-hugging. It must look as if she is being held together by the dress. Bodice: straight cut front and back. Yoke: diagonal. Sleeves: excessively padded. Skirt: center seam front and back asymmetric. Turban: must cover all her hair. Embroidery: vines of silver sequins.”
To the right of that design is one for the crêpe de chine casaque with gold lamé dots, along with a fabric swatch with a pattern that recalls a sea of daisies. Like in all the subsequent designs in this display case, Baum signed these drawings with her initials “B.B.” to the left and right of a tree, her trademark doodle.

4th film: Lola.
Two designs for Barbara Sukowa in the title role. At the top is a sketch of a knee-length jersey dress. It has short sleeves and a bow on the left shoulder. The close-fitting skirt has side godets. A second view of the front shows the dress worn with a stole. The back view is at the bottom of the sheet, with Baum’s signature next to it.
Below that is a sketch of the organdy summer dress, with the front view on the left, and the back view on the right. On the bottom left is Baum’s signature with notes on the dress to the right of that: “Gossamer summer dress with a petticoat and accompanying corset underdress.” The dress has truncated sleeves and a Peter Pan collar. A belt with a fabric knot at the front marks the place where the wide flared skirt begins. A tactile graphic for this dress can be found in front of Stage 9, in the center.

5th film: Querelle.
On display are three A4 pages of sketches. The first is a design for a negligée for Jeanne Moreau in her role as Lysiane. Pictured is a very short slip with thin straps. On the bottom right of the sheet Baum noted: “Sheer georgette, pure black silk.” Over the slip is a sheer robe with a train. Baum notes: “Bodice: black lace. Skirt: applique lace pattern.”
Another sheet shows the design of the “snake-print dress,” also for Jeanne Moreau. The front view of this close-fitting strapless dress takes up most of the A4 sheet. The décolleté is covered with a transparent fabric that fills the neckline to the throat. Two sketches of the back view complete this design. On the left edge of the sheet is a piece of the dark devoré fabric with a snake-print pattern.
The third sketch shows the naval uniform worn by Franco Nero in his role as Lieutenant Seblon: a double-breasted uniform jacket with epaulettes, and gold braid on the right shoulder.